Analyses of human myogenic stem cells

Dr. rer. nat. Andreas Marg

Not only injury but daily exposure to physical stress as well requires the continuous regeneration of skeletal muscle. The cellular compartment which enables this regeneration is represented by a quiescent muscular progenitor cell pool localized beneath each single muscle fiber, the satellite cells. They effectively repair injured muscle until old age but their regenerative potential could not be utilized yet for therapeutic strategies in muscular dystrophies. Most of the pivotal studies on satellite cells were performed in mouse models, while the understanding of the human counterpart and their homing niche has remained very poor.

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Characterization of human MYF5 positive stem cell population and conditions of commitment to the skeletal muscle or brown adipose tissue lineage

Dr. rer. nat. Andreas Marg

It is well known that brown adipose tissue is, unlike white adipose tissue, is able to dissipate energy as heat and plays therefore a potential role in maintaining energy balance.

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Membrane repair in human skeletal myotubes

Dr. rer. nat. Andreas Marg

The plasma membrane is the physical barrier between the cell and their environment. Plasma membrane disruptions are frequently physiological events in cell live. The ability of the cell to repair damages is indispensable of live. Skeletal muscles are permanently exposed to mechanical stress and are often subjected to injury. Therefore these muscle cells need an effective membrane resealing system.

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Peptide mediated retargeting of Dysferlin: Generation of an animal model

Dr. med. Verena Schöwel

Mutations in dysferlin (DYSF) cause limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B due to defects in muscle membrane repair. More than 1300 mutations over the entire gene (DYSF) have been identified. A third are missense mutations.

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Dynamics of muscle caveolae

Dr.-Ing. Tobias Timmel

Caveolae are flask-like invaginations of the cell membrane with an average diameter of 50-100 nm. They occur in many mammalian cell types and are involved in numerous dynamic cellular processes such as signal transduction and endocytosis. The formation and regulation of these cholesterol rich structures depends on the presence of caveolin and cavin proteins, whereas Caveolin-3 and Cavin-4 are muscle specific. The lack of these proteins has been strongly linked to several diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and muscular diseases.

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The role of caveolae in statin induced Myopathy

Dr. rer. nat. Stefanie Grunwald

In October 2010, I started my first postdoctoral appointment in the group of Simone Spuler. I am involved in project 10 of the Clinical Research Group 192 (P10 in KFO192) with Elisabeth Steinhagen-Thiessen and Hans Knoblauch as principal investigators.

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